Amanda Johnson

Amanda Johnson

Attorney

Bar admissions:

Arizona: 2018

Washington state: 2002
U.S. District Court Western District of Washington: 2003

education:

Seattle University School of Law
Seattle, Washington
JD- 2002

Arkansas State University
Jonesboro, Arkansas
BA – 1999

a little bit about me

I, like many attorneys, ended up practicing Family Law by accident. My plan in law school was to do Estate and Business Planning, and I did that for the first several years of my practice in Washington State. A friend asked me to talk to one of their friends who needed advice for a divorce. When we spoke, I realized they needed more than just advice, so I explained to them I had never handled a divorce before but if they wanted me to do so, we could learn together. That case changed my career.

Since 2008, my practice has evolved to focus on the issues facing families as they too evolve. A divorce feels remarkably like a death to many clients, so I still use the skills I learned in Estate Planning to help people through the traumatic loss of a relationship. I consider it part of my job to help people address their own emotional pain and where they are in the grieving process in a way that helps them see most of what goes on in court as a business transaction.

Your family is not ending. It is dividing like a cell. Both parts will go on and grow, but we need to ensure they can work together for years to come when coparenting is involved.

Many of the cases I handle have a complicating component. Sometimes a parent has mental health or substance abuse issues that must be addressed by the court. Sometimes a child has special needs that must be taken into account. Relocations can be complicated but are possible. As noted in Anna Karenina, “happy families are alike, each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” It is important for your attorney to understand what makes your unhappy family different from others so they can take what is undoubtedly a proven formula for success and adapt it to fit your needs.

My background as a banker, a stockbroker, and a business planner helps me deal with financially complex issues, but even when “only” money is involved, this field can take an emotional toll on clients. I strive to provide advice and explanations that allow my clients to sleep soundly at night.

Amanda Johnson

Amanda Johnson

Attorney

Bar admissions:

Arizona: 2018

Washington state: 2002
U.S. District Court Western District of Washington: 2003

education:

Seattle University School of Law
Seattle, Washington
JD- 2002

Arkansas State University
Jonesboro, Arkansas
BA – 1999

a little bit about me

I, like many attorneys, ended up practicing Family Law by accident. My plan in law school was to do Estate and Business Planning, and I did that for the first several years of my practice in Washington State. A friend asked me to talk to one of their friends who needed advice for a divorce. When we spoke, I realized they needed more than just advice, so I explained to them I had never handled a divorce before but if they wanted me to do so, we could learn together. That case changed my career.

Since 2008, my practice has evolved to focus on the issues facing families as they too evolve. A divorce feels remarkably like a death to many clients, so I still use the skills I learned in Estate Planning to help people through the traumatic loss of a relationship. I consider it part of my job to help people address their own emotional pain and where they are in the grieving process in a way that helps them see most of what goes on in court as a business transaction.

Your family is not ending. It is dividing like a cell. Both parts will go on and grow, but we need to ensure they can work together for years to come when coparenting is involved.

Many of the cases I handle have a complicating component. Sometimes a parent has mental health or substance abuse issues that must be addressed by the court. Sometimes a child has special needs that must be taken into account. Relocations can be complicated but are possible. As noted in Anna Karenina, “happy families are alike, each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” It is important for your attorney to understand what makes your unhappy family different from others so they can take what is undoubtedly a proven formula for success and adapt it to fit your needs.

My background as a banker, a stockbroker, and a business planner helps me deal with financially complex issues, but even when “only” money is involved, this field can take an emotional toll on clients. I strive to provide advice and explanations that allow my clients to sleep soundly at night.